New study finds that redwood trees can store more CO2 than other trees

Redwoods are a great source of carbon storage.

They can store up to 40 times as much CO2 as other trees.

But they also store much more carbon than most other plants.

Here’s why. 

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have found that redwoods can store CO2 in their needles and twigs. 

This type of storage is called biofilm storage. 

The biofilm on the trunk of a redwood can take up to 300 times more carbon in the form of woody debris than the wood in the branches.

So, when you harvest a tree, it can store much, much more CO 2 than it is absorbing in the tree.

The researchers also found that a tree’s needles and the roots of its trees can hold up to 100 times as many carbon as a tree in a forest.

So if you’re interested in storing more CO-2, redwoods are the place to look. 

So, if you can get a tree that is harvested with a planter, it might be the best place to store that extra carbon. 

For more information, visit the university’s redwood research site.