Morgan Advanced Materials creates polymer sheets that can be spun to produce solar cells

The material for a polymer that can generate solar cells was created by a group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, but its origin is not known.

Morgan Advanced Materials, based in Chicago, is working on a material that would replace carbon nanotubes (CNNTs), a material used in solar cells, in order to generate solar energy.

This material has already been shown to be strong enough to convert sunlight into electricity, and could be used in electric vehicles as well.

The researchers used a material called graphene, which is a type of carbon nanocube.

That material is very thin and has a wide surface area.

This allows the graphene to stretch out as it is stretched, making it extremely strong.

The scientists used a method called “super-stretch,” in which they stretch the material to its maximum size, while making a few cuts at the edges.

The material was then used to make a thin sheet of graphene that can stretch up to 10 times its original length, which makes it ideal for making solar cells.

The researchers were able to produce a sheet of a very thin layer of graphene in a matter of minutes, compared to just a few hours for traditional carbon nanostructures.

The paper detailing the work was published on April 3 in Nature Nanotechnology.

The group used a process called “bismuth disulfide disulfidase,” which involves cutting a small amount of graphene at the edge of a sheet.

They then applied this to the graphene sheet.

This process makes the material strong enough for it to be spun into sheets.

They found that the spin rate of the material was between 20 and 30 percent faster than traditional carbon-nanotube sheets.

The spin rate was also lower than that of conventional graphene sheets.

This makes it possible to make sheets that are strong enough that they can be used to manufacture solar cells for use in solar vehicles, which could be solar cells or batteries.

The new material is also much more conductive than conventional graphene, meaning that it can be more easily melted and melted again, as well as hardened.

Morgan has also been working on making solar panels that use solar energy instead of heat.

In 2016, it was announced that it had developed a material for solar cells that uses a new process for splitting hydrogen atoms.

The company has also made solar cells using carbon nanoscale nanotube films, which it is working to make solar cells out of.

It has also begun work on solar cells with carbon nanofibers that can produce solar energy from hydrogen.

The company is also developing solar cells in order for them to use energy from the sun.

In 2021, it will start testing the technology in a pilot project, and it will make the materials available to other companies that want to use them for solar-related applications.

Morgan said it plans to release the first commercial solar cells from this research in 2020.